Archive for June, 2006

WinFS heads for Microsoft database | CNET News.com – Is the walk to Cairo over?

Monday, June 26th, 2006

WinFS heads for Microsoft database | CNET News.com

According to CNET NEWS.COM Microsoft is no longer pursuing delivery of WinFS, the new file-system for Windows.

The new strategy seems to be to develop the mature parts of WinFS for use in SQL Server and ADO.NET.

This sounds like the final demise of the Cairo project, the mythical project to deliver a distributed object oriented file-system, that has been touted by Microsoft since the early 90ies.

Could the long walk to Cairo be over?

Top 10 Web Developer Libraries – Cameron Olthuis

Monday, June 26th, 2006

Top 10 Web Developer Libraries – Cameron Olthuis

Well, I’m not really doing much webdevelopment these days, prefering to work with standard software like MediaWiki, Drupal and WordPress – hey I’m a “content type of guy”.

But this list of Web Developer Libraries by Cameron Olthuis, that was linked from CNET NEWS.COM, looks like a good place to check, if I should someday begin doing some rich Internet client development. There are actually some projects, that could fall into that category, on my project list.

100 idées pour utiliser RSS – Vtech – “Dude, where’s my beta?”

Monday, June 26th, 2006

100 idées pour utiliser RSS – Vtech

Vtech has published a catalogue of ideas for using RSS, it’s a great inspiration.

I had actually forgotten that I got a related great idea for using RSS from Ben Hammersley, Google to RSS using SOAP API, and I experimented with the Google SOAP API some months ago, due to a project that was suggested on macnyt.dk in this thread, Et lettere avanceret Google spørgsmål.

The purpose of the project, was to make it possible to search multiple sites on Google, it turned out that Google already supported that feature, but I had some fun making SOAP calls from PHP – I know I have no life – but hey, it actually worked.

Thanks to the article on Vtech that I found through a CNET forum posting, 100 way to use RSS, I remembered this forgotten project of mine, thanks!

Now I wonder: “Dude, where’s my beta?”…

HOPL:History Of Programming Languages

Saturday, June 24th, 2006

HOPL: History Of Programming Languages from ACM

After browsing the Alan Kay Wikipedia entry, my attention was drawn to the “History Of Programming Languages”, proceeding that has been published by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This is a very good collection of documents, usually written by the people who were involved in the development of the different languages, including some Danes – Concurrent Pascal. Unfortunately ACM requires a subscription to access the articles, I guess I need to fork out some money and get the paper print.

Hmm great! The ACM web-site currently has an error, so I can’t buy the book online. Should I join ACM? It’ll cost me USD 198, if I throw in an account for the digital library. It would be cool to have access to the ACM digital library.

Considering…BTW it looks like ACM should add some new articles, e.g.. on Java, Python and Ruby.

Sure a lot of things has happened since 1993, but I suppose none of the newer languages are revolutionary, or even more than marginally different from what already existed in 1993, that is somewhat discouraging.

Sell your expertise with Ether | News.blog | CNET News.com

Thursday, June 22nd, 2006

Sell your expertise with Ether | News.blog | CNET News.com

Ether sounds like a really clever idea, get payed for what you know.

The idea:

1. Sign up with Ether and you get assigned a phone number people can contact you by
2. Set your fee
3. Define your opening hours (eg. when you’ll accept calls
4. People will call you for assistance only if they’ve accepted your fee

The catch…Ether rakes in a 15% comission…But this sounds like a realtively hassel free way of selling your consulting services.

The service should be available in Denmark.

Clever!

Review: Gnarls Barkley in Copenhagen June 21st 2006

Thursday, June 22nd, 2006

Gnarls Barkley

Yesterday the popular band Gnarls Barkley visited the VEGA venue in Copenhagen.

I hadn’t really heard too much of the music, but I had of course heard the track “Crazy”, so I didn’t really know what to expect, beside the fact that DJ DangerMouse is involved with the project, and that should, by itself, be a recommendation, since he was involved with some of the most exciting releases of 2005, like the second Gorillaz album and the DangerDoom project.

The band looked like a 70ies funk-band wearing white suits, and the set-up included three backing singers, and a couple of violin and cello players, on top of that two keyboard players, and a traditional set-up with drums, bass and guitar. Interesting indeed.

And it became even stranger, when they announced themselves as another band because Gnarls Barkley couldn’t make it, and opened with a cover of “She blinded me with science”, I doubt that too many in the packed VEGA venue recognised that – the tone was set for something different.

The band was extremely tight, playing a tough kind of traditional 70ies inspired soul and funk sparkled with “strange sounds” and rock riffs.

The singer Cee-Lo has a great traditional soul singer voice, that goes perfect with the music.

The only down point to an otherwise great set, was that it was too short, approximately an hour, but that is understandable since the band has had such a short history.

High points were the live versions of “Gone Daddy Gone” and of course Crazy sent the venue jumping.

The set ended with a sound inferno, where the guitar player really let himself loose.

I left the venue with a big smile on my lip, this had been a great evening. “FUNK TOGET KØRTE”!

Highly recommended.

InTheMac.com…Apple Mac Software +

Wednesday, June 21st, 2006

InTheMac.com…Apple Mac Software +

Just discovered this Mac OS X software site, it looks very nice, and above all, it seems to be updated quite frequently.

Being a recent Tiger user, I’m shopping for Dashboard Widgets, and this was how I found this site, Googling for a flickr Widget.

I guess I’ll stop looking for Widgets after a while, but Widgets is a simple and quite useful technology, that can be quite addictive.

And the site really is putting RSS feeds to good use, with an extensive list of feeds sorted by category.

Highly recommended.

1000 flere Event afsluttet

Wednesday, June 21st, 2006

Overskudskage 1000 Flere Event1000 flere Event afsluttet – WiKim

Kære venner,

Tusinde tak for hjælpen, det var et super arrangement. Jeg er utrolig stolt af vores organisation, og jeg syntes at vi formåede at sætte en positiv og anden dagsorden i går.

Det er utroligt fedt at sige til folk, der taler ondt om indvandrere, at man skam “arbejder for at der kommer nogle flere”, de ser meget sjove ud i ansigtet.

Til daglig arbejder jeg for at vi gør noget mere for dem der allerede er her, gennem Foreningen Netværksgruppen i Mjølnerparken, hvor jeg bla. laver lektiehjælp.

Besøg vores hjemmeside på http://www.sprogoglektier.dk for at se hvad det går ud på, og meld dig som frivillig, vi har helt sikkert et tilbud som vil passe dig.

Talk:Alan Kay – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wednesday, June 21st, 2006

Talk:Alan Kay – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I was just checking the Alan Kay article on Wikipedia, and I switched to the Talk page, to find a comment by the man himself…

He makes this interesting point:

But today, it matters not that Smalltalk was an “improvement on its successors” (as Tony Hoare said about Algol). None of the so-called OOP languages around today are above threshold to deal with programming in the 21st century. I think this is a huge problem, that is made more severe by the vocational temptations to “get good at something bad” in order to make a living. This has produced a staggering legacy of moribund code, that makes it hard for young people especially to think about qualitatively better ways to proceed.

Very well put, but do we have alternatives today? I have no idea.

I remember a BYTE magazine cover story from 15 years or so ago, “There is a silver bullet”. That “silver bullet was OOP. Maybe it was, but the challenges of software development has also changed. Today we slave away using the same patterns again and again, it’s not exciting writing database access classes and wire them up to the UI, usually starting from scratch, since the new app you’re doing, is slightly different.

Currently people are looking into alternatives to C++ like languages, like Python and Ruby, but they’re still rather traditional. But these languages do seem to have some great frameworks, like TurboGears and Rails.

What I really find interesting is a video where Steve Jobs is demoing NeXTSTEP version 3, he’s demoing amazing application development without any coding at all! Why didn’t this catch on?

Another problem. The traditional web has been a nightmare in terms of usability, due to the fact that everybody basically has been writing their own custom UI.

What the web really is, is a list of connected links, URLs/URIs. What we need to start doing is to assign more meta-data to links, so that we can stop using the browser.

RSS feeds are a step in that direction. Direct links to media files and especially streams is another. After somebody posted a collection of direct links for the Danish Broadcasting Corporation’s (DR) radio streams, so that I could use the VideoLAN Client (VLC) to listen to music, I’ve finally bothered with it. Why oh why does the media companies develop their own embedded players, it’s a serious nightmare and completely un-called for.

Lat – Long Finder: This page helps you find Latitude and Longitude

Sunday, June 18th, 2006

Lat – Long Finder: This page helps you find Latitude and Longitude

This page has a quite useful Google Maps based service to help find the Latitude and Longitude of a location.